Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This essay undertakes a long overdue analysis of Hurree Babu in Rudyard Kipling's Kim, whom it places in the context of anticolonial sentiment pace Said and reads as a politically charged character, subject to novelistic controls such as comedic reduction on account of his potentially disruptive energy. It considers Hurree Babu as an early representation of characters like Forster's Dr. Aziz and Rushdie's Saleem Sinai, who feel the twin obligations of immersion in and resistance to Englishness.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-7303
Print ISSN
0040-4691
Pages
pp. 56-78
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-24
Open Access
No
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