Abstract

abstract:

The article offers an analysis of two nineteenth-century dystopias as texts exceptional in their treatment of fashion as a phenomenon central to plot and character development, a feature that breaks with the tradition of seeing clothing as a relatively minor element in the structure of alternative eutopian and dystopian realities. A consideration of the two novels—J. L. Collins's Queen Krinaleen (1874) and Walter Besant's The Inner House (1888)—in view of Baudrillard's and Barthes's theories of fashion results in a semiotic reading that highlights the tautological function of the vestimentary code, which proves its strength by radically transforming the societies and determining the meaning formation mechanisms in both texts.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2154-9648
Print ISSN
1045-991X
Pages
pp. 428-450
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-17
Open Access
No
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