Abstract

This article considers how questions of authorial publicity are linked to--as well as by--James via the bicycle. This vehicle’s faddish celebrity and association with the print industries lent itself to debates about the visibility of public figures in the late nineteenth century. In his tale, ‘The Papers’ (1903), James draws upon the bicycle’s associations with physical and media exposure to dramatize such anxieties, indicating the bicycle as a technology that threatened to reveal both the writer’s body and his process. Figurations of James cycling continue to trope the author’s own aversion to publicity.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 23-36
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-16
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.