Abstract

Abstract:

Sir Walter Scott was a recognized admirer of Miguel de Cervantes and his work. As some of his biographers have noted, the Scottish author recognized his desire to become an writer after reading Cervantes's Exemplary Novels during a long period of convalescence. Despite this early and continued interest in Cervantes and Don Quixote, Cervantine criticism and scholars of historical fiction have failed to analyze this influence in depth. The present article tries to establish how the Cervantine novel becomes a clear model for Scott's historical fiction, analyzing the debt which the Scottish author's first novel, Waverley, or 'Tis Sixty Years Since, evinces some structural and thematic aspects of Don Quixote, concluding that Cervantes's masterpiece is an extremely important element in the origins of the historical genre.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1943-3840
Print ISSN
0277-6995
Pages
pp. 169-201
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-20
Open Access
No
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