Abstract

Abstract:

This essay articulates the possibilities of writing black ethnography that centers black and diasporic ways of knowing and thinking time, space, and place that are emptied of the modernist strictures of the formal essay. Black ethnography is conceived of as a decolonial, art-making practice that refuses genre as well as disciplinarity. Elaborating on Hortense Spiller's theory of interior intersubjectivity, this essay turns toward symbolic economies of blackness rooted in alternative cosmological paradigms and lifeworlds of postslave contemporary life. Using phonoethnography to loop time, s/place, and experience backward and forward simultaneously, this essay honors the Spillerian imaginary of the "speaking flesh."

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Additional Information

ISSN
1092-311X
Print ISSN
2572-6633
Pages
pp. 148-168
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-13
Open Access
No
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