Abstract

Abstract:

After a first, short-lived attempt in the 1970s, the cooperation of historical and anthropological approaches to witchcraft has recently experienced a renaissance. This article discusses both cross-fertilizations and persistent gaps in the interdisciplinary exchanges, arguing that the perception of witchcraft-related phenomena outside of Europe continues to suffer from insufficient historicization, while many historians of early modern Europe cling to a European Sonderweg which renders witchcraft in early modern Europe as unique and, ultimately, incomparable. Issues of interdisciplinary cooperation are then discussed using Tanzania as a case study.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1940-5111
Print ISSN
1556-8547
Pages
pp. 362-401
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-09
Open Access
No
Archive Status
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