Abstract

Abstract:

This essay explores small "ordinary" experiences of moral harm as problems of social injustice. Starting with two stories, we first argue against a dominant framework of personal responsibility that assigns responsibility to particular blameworthy agents. Instead we sketch an account of why structural responsibility for social harm must be considered, drawing on the work of Iris Marion Young and Pierre Bourdieu. Finally, drawing on Margaret Walker's notion of moral repair and Christopher Marshall's interpretation of the parable of the Good Samaritan, we sketch an account of Christian moral responsibility grounded in restorative justice that seeks to address daily experiences of moral harm through the moral repair work of neighbor-love.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2326-2176
Print ISSN
1540-7942
Pages
pp. 153-169
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-02
Open Access
No
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