Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Labor time has been proposed as an alternative payment vehicle in eliciting preferences for public goods in nonmonetized communities. However, we so far have no empirical evidence for situations where the labor-time elicitation format reduces the respondent's contribution uncertainty. In this study we compare the uncertainty of people's stated willingness to contribute time and money for a local public good in a nonmonetized small-scale community in Papua New Guinea. We find that independently of conversion issues, uncertainty is reduced when respondents are asked to contribute time instead of money. Moreover, we find that risk aversion, risk apprehension, and risk exposure are significant predictors of uncertainty.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-8325
Print ISSN
0023-7639
Pages
pp. 73-86
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-02
Open Access
No
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