Abstract

abstract:

A substantive body of literature has been dedicated to explaining Locke's crucial role in the development of a new logic in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, commonly referred to as the "logic of ideas" or "facultative logic." I examine Locke's relation to logic from a different angle. I focus on two philosophical issues that permeate his remarks about logic in various texts. One is about what grounds the alleged authority of putative logical rules. The other concerns the relation between logic and the psychology of reasoning. These issues are not only historically significant but also continuous with an ongoing modern discourse in philosophy of logic.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1538-4586
Print ISSN
0022-5053
Pages
pp. 75-99
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-17
Open Access
No
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