Abstract

Abstract:

This article explores the conflation of rhetorical and physical acts of rape and massacre in a range of early modern drama, culminating in a case study of the two phenomena in Alarum for London (1599). Rooting its analysis in the Lucrece myth, the essay demonstrates how prominent traditions of reading rape — as an attack on the soul, and as an attack on a city — provide a rubric through which Alarum can be understood. When enacted concomitantly, rape and massacre have the propensity to destroy body and soul, individual, and the wider society to which they belong.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2293-7609
Print ISSN
1206-9078
Pages
pp. 49-75
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-12
Open Access
No
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