Abstract

Abstract:

This article examines the political discourse surrounding Sir Robert Walpole's Norfolk Congresses—extended social gatherings held at his Norfolk residence of Houghton throughout his political ascendancy (1721–1742). By analyzing both pro-government and oppositional accounts, the article seeks to complicate traditional stereotypes of Court Whig corruption, revealing Walpole as a problematically hospitable figure and demonstrating how conflicting traditions of Whig sociability struggled for dominance in textual representations of the events.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 235-254
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-06
Open Access
No
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