Abstract

To fight forgetfulness and denial following the trauma of the Nakba (catastrophe) in 1948, some Palestinian folklorists have sought to collect, document, analyze, and translate pre-1948 Palestinian folktales. One major example is Speak, Bird, Speak Again (1989), a collection edited by Ibrahim Muhawi and Sharif Kanaana, and its Arabic version, Qul Ya Tayer (2001). I examine folktales from the collections, along with the compilers’ paratextual elements to explore the nature of memory and identity formation. By synthesizing some concepts in memory studies, I discuss the power of the folktale through the narrative of peasantry in recreating memory sites and consolidating Palestinian collective, national, and cultural identity.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1536-1802
Print ISSN
1521-4281
Pages
pp. 217-238
Launched on MUSE
2017-12-15
Open Access
No
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