Abstract

The author traces the artistic and institutional complexities of preserving sonic art. He situates these problems in an analysis of the iconic public sound installation Times Square (1977–1992; 2002–present), which was constructed in an abandoned subway ventilation chamber by sonic artist Max Neuhaus (1939–2009). Next, the author describes how it aided a revitalization of the Times Square district but fell into disrepair and was dismantled in 1992. The author then describes a 2002 reconstruction that incorporated long-term speculative self-preservation strategies. Finally, the author discusses the acquisition of Times Square by the Dia Art Foundation, highlighting challenges that circumscribe preserving sonic art.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1531-4812
Print ISSN
0961-1215
Pages
pp. 21-26
Launched on MUSE
2017-12-15
Open Access
No
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