Un ciclo musical para la vida en la misión Jesuítica: Los cuadernos de ofertorios de San Rafael, Chiquitos (S.XVIII) ed. by Leonardo Waisman, and: Un ciclo musical para la vida en la misión Jesuítica: Los cuadernos de ofertorios de San Rafael, Chiquitos (S.XVIII) ed. by Leonardo Waisman, and: Un ciclo musical para la vida en la misión Jesuítica: Los cuadernos de ofertorios de San Rafael, Chiquitos (S.XVIII) ed. by Leonardo Waisman (review)
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Un ciclo musical para la vida en la misión Jesuítica: Los cuadernos de ofertorios de San Rafael, Chiquitos (S.XVIII). Editados por Leonardo Waisman, con la colaboración de Julián D’Ávila, Claudio Rodrigo Balaguer, Clarisa Pedrotti, Lucas Reccitelli, y Marisa Restiffo. Córdoba, Argentina: Editorial Brujas, 2015. Vol. 1: Introducción y aparato critico. [Introd. in Spa., p. 4–20; tables, p. 21–41; crit. report in Spa., p. 43–236; abbrevs. in Spa., p. 237; bibliog., p. 238–40; table of contents (complete work), p. 241–45. ISBN 978-987-591-625-1 (vol. 1), ISBN 978-987-591-624-1 (complete work). ARS 2,205, inclusive of vols. 1, 2A, and 2B.]
Un ciclo musical para la vida en la misión Jesuítica: Los cuadernos de ofertorios de San Rafael, Chiquitos (S.XVIII). Editados por Leonardo Waisman, con la colaboración de Julián D’Ávila, Claudio Rodrigo Balaguer, Clarisa Pedrotti, Lucas Reccitelli, y Marisa Restiffo. Córdoba, Argentina: Editorial Brujas, 2015. Vol. 2A: Partituras–A. [Score, p. 3–335; table of contents, p. 337–38. ISBN 978-987-591-626-5 (vol. 2A), ISBN 978-987-591-624-1 (complete work). ARS 2,205, inclusive of vols. 1, 2A, and 2B.]
Un ciclo musical para la vida en la misión Jesuítica: Los cuadernos de ofertorios de San Rafael, Chiquitos (S.XVIII). Editados por Leonardo Waisman, con la colaboración de Julián D’Ávila, Claudio Rodrigo Balaguer, Clarisa Pedrotti, Lucas Reccitelli, y Marisa Restiffo. Córdoba, Argentina: Editorial Brujas, 2015. Vol. 2B: Partituras–B. [Score, p. 337–694; appendix, p. 696–702; table of contents, p. 703–4. ISBN 978-987-591-627-2 (vol. 2B), ISBN 978-987-591-624-1 (complete work). ARS 2,205, inclusive of vols. 1, 2A, and 2B.]

It has been almost thirty years now since the late T. Frank Kennedy announced to the musicological world the discovery of the Jesuit music collection of the Chiquitos missions, Bolivia (“Colonial Music from the Episcopal Archive of Concepción, Bolivia,” Latin American Music Review9, no. 1 [Spring–Summer 1988]: 1–17). Even if, in the meanwhile, neither transcribers nor publishers have been idle, editions of this repertory that are informed by scholarly standards are still scanty. This Ciclo musical, produced by an American-trained musicologist who has been working in the field of Jesuit music for decades, is a welcome addition to the literature. Specialized performers will certainly rejoice in the enormous amount of material that the collection puts in their hands—almost ninety compositions—while researchers will at last be able to access critical editions of the repertory.

This music belongs to one (of two) major archives resulting from Jesuit activity in the Southern Cone of South America; the [End Page 303]other one is the Archivo musical de Moxos (San Ignacio, Beni, Bolivia). Between 1609 and 1767, Jesuits founded and governed a large number of mission towns in border areas of South America, established in order to convert indigenous people to Christianity, turn them into Western-style urban dwellers, and make them respectful vassals of the Spanish king. Thirty towns, well populated by people of Guarani ethnicity, and strategically placed in the present-day “triple frontier” area between Argentina, Paraguay, and Brazil, entered the European consciousness in the eighteenth century through an intense intellectual debate on missionary aims and methods, freedom, power, and religion. Their value and fame were their doom; most of them were destroyed in the early nineteenth century. Ten other settlements in what nowadays is eastern Bolivia enjoyed far less fame, but preserved more of their Jesuit heritage. The region is known as Chiquitos (“little ones”), based on imagined qualities of the native dwellers (they were not particularly small, but their houses had low doors), who actually formed a true mosaic of ethnicities (they are known today as Chiquitanos). European-style church music informed a number of very prominent practices in all of these places. Musical sources for the thirty Guarani towns were lost, yet the complete archive for the mission of San Rafael in eastern Bolivia and portions of other collections were preserved, now reunited...


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