Abstract

This article provides an analysis of the best-selling Greek pregnancy guide, Birth is Love, by Aleka Sikaki-Douka. The article examines how the advice on offer, though thoroughly grounded in North American and European expert obstetrical knowledge, is nonetheless reconfigured in significant ways that reflect historically Greek rhetorical strategies and story lines that ultimately embody specific national inflections of what modern maternity entails. That is, even as the expert advice on offer in this Greek pregnancy guide encourages women to reshape themselves in accordance with universal medico-scientific canons, the ideologies of gender, motherhood and citizenship implicit in these texts also reflect meanings and understandings specific to the national context in which it was written.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2523-9465
Print ISSN
1016-3476
Pages
pp. 387-412
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-11
Open Access
No
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