Abstract

This article explores the transformations that have taken place in the field of paid domestic work in modern Greece as a consequence of the massive entry of immigrants into the profession and the meagre presence of Greek domestic workers. By comparing Greek live-out domestic workers and Filipina live-in domestic workers, the article examines how the kinship model that traditionally regulated relations between Greek domestic workers and their employers has been abandoned in the case of Greek live-out domestic workers, while being redeployed and re-invented with respect to Filipina domestic workers. Through inter-cultural managements of kinship (Filipinas) and fellow-ethnic managements of domesticity (Greeks), reproductions of the Greek domestic model of ‘household’ and transformations in the fulfilment of female identities have arisen over time.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2523-9465
Print ISSN
1016-3476
Pages
pp. 311-340
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-11
Open Access
No
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