Abstract

This essay explores the ways in which, during the turbulent decade of 1857–1867, the bonds between the Mexican state and its citizens were refashioned, in the midst of a constitutional overhaul, the establishment of a monarchical regime, civil war and a foreign invasion. It focuses on how rival governments conceived and implemented the laws that were to constitute political community, ensure loyalty, mobilize men and resources, and demarcate civil and religious jurisdiction. It examines how citizens navigated the ambiguities of the laws of war, and the ways in which the triumphant Republicans used them to punish, exclude and delegitimize their former rivals, but also to reconcile a divided nation.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2159-9807
Print ISSN
2154-4727
Pages
pp. 570-596
Launched on MUSE
2017-10-31
Open Access
No
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