Abstract

Abstract:

My maternal grandmother, Ethel Phillips, labored for over fifty-nine years as a domestic servant. She worked in her longest capacity as a housekeeper for three generations of the Clark family in Dearborn, Michigan from 1955 to 1998. By conducting interviews with Ethel's daughters, family members, and past employers, I track the complicated relationships around what it means to live and love within the racial and social hierarchy of domestic service. I argue that the language used to describe affection for domestic servants by their employers obscures the labor conditions that accompany their work and worth in a world of unprotected labor.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1934-1520
Print ISSN
0732-1562
Pages
pp. 160-173
Launched on MUSE
2017-10-26
Open Access
No
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