Abstract

Abstract:

This essay looks at the complexity of the representation of racial otherness in the eighteenth-century Caribbean, focusing on the work of the painter Agostino Brunias, who worked mainly in Dominica, which was an island recently taken over by the British from the French. The essay argues that such representation cannot be reduced to colonial propaganda or anthropology, but depends on a wide range of factors involving geography, the different forms of slavery, and sharp conficts of attitude among the dominant colonial settlers towards the racial mixture endemic in the Caribbean colonies.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 1-21
Launched on MUSE
2017-10-19
Open Access
No
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