Abstract

Abstract:

A request for information about New York City's typhoid outbreak of 1911 prompted one of the first court rulings to reverse the nineteenth-century trend of opening access to government information. In the background was a fundamental shift in the political theory of American local government and a clash of two different approaches to reform of municipal government: that of the outside gadfly versus the approach of working within the institution. The case In the Matter of Allen set a pattern for freedom of information law of narrowing a statutory right in order to protect institutions of government.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2166-3033
Print ISSN
2164-8034
Pages
pp. 385-411
Launched on MUSE
2017-10-14
Open Access
No
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