Abstract

Abstract:

The laughter of Samuel Beckett's characters is frequently strange and unsettling. Characters laugh unpredictably, and the reader or spectator does not feel prompted to join them; when we do laugh in response to the Beckettian text, we are often shocked by our own lack of propriety. I examine laughter theory and the laughter in Gothic texts to explore why Beckettian laughter so disconcerts us, and what the implications of this affective response are for our understanding of what constitutes the human, and of our own ostensibly human identities.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 1-19
Launched on MUSE
2017-10-03
Open Access
No
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