Abstract

The "born this way" narrative remains a popular way to defend nonnormative genders and sexualities in the United States. While feminist and queer theorists have critiqued the narrative's implicit ahistorical and essentialist understanding of sexuality, the narrative's incorporation by the state as a way to police gender identity has gone largely underdeveloped. I argue that transgender accounts of this narrative reorient it amid questions of temporality, race, colonialism, and the nation-state, thereby allowing for a critique that does justice to the enmeshment of categories of difference.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-9383
Print ISSN
0891-625X
Pages
pp. 372-384
Launched on MUSE
2017-07-27
Open Access
No
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