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  • Contributors

Leslie Walker Bickford is an assistant professor of English and Director of the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards at Winthrop University. Her work on issues of race in Faulkner appears in Faulkner and Morrison and is forthcoming in Southern Studies. Her research interests include integrating race theory into Lacanian psychoanalytic frameworks.

Francisco Delgado specializes in contemporary multi-ethnic American literature and Writing Studies. His current book project examines how the tenets of the dystopian genre align with the historical experiences of racial and cultural minorities. In May 2017, he earned his PhD in English from Stony Brook University, where he variously taught for the English, Writing, and Asian American Studies departments. He also received the 2016–17 Humanities New York Public Humanities Fellowship, for which he created a website that teaches conversational phrases of the Seneca Indian language (www.LearningTheSenecaLanguage.com).

Colleen Donnelly is an associate professor at the University of Colorado at Denver specializing in medieval literature and the representation of women and women’s voices in medieval and more recent literature. She recently published The Marys of Medieval Drama: The Middle English Digby and N-Town In Translation (2016) and is currently expanding her research to work on issues of mental disorders of women and children in modern, and particularly Irish, literature.

Kenneth (Ken) Eckert is assistant professor of English at Hanyang University (ERICA), Ansan, Korea. Although his interests are broad and include (post)modernism, satire, and theology in British literature, he is chiefly a Chaucerian and medievalist, recently publishing his first book, Middle English Romances in Translation (Sidestone Press, 2015).

Pete Fredlake is an educator and freelance photographer. He has been a classroom English teacher and has led professional development events around the world. Inspired by the words and work of Walker Evans, Pete returned to photography in 2005. Pete has photographed gorillas in Rwanda, street markets in the Middle East and Asia, and landscapes and monuments and people everywhere he travels. He believes that we should approach all subjects as vulnerable—people, animals, the environment—and treat them with empathy and respect. If we do, the results will be beautiful. Pete continues to teach and create photography projects in Washington, DC. He lives with his wife of 39 years, Mary, to whom “Paper” is dedicated. [End Page 246]

Gregg Heitschmidt is a native of California but currently resides and teaches in North Carolina. His main research interests are in the history, literature, and art of the American West; he is especially interested in human responses to, and interactions with, various landscape space(s). He has been the recipient of three different National Endowment for the Humanities’ grants, has published articles on literature of the West, and has taught in higher education for the last decade.

Paula Kot is an associate professor of English at Niagara University. Her teaching and research interests focus on nineteenth-century American literature, American women writers, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Jeffrey Mather is assistant professor in the Department of English at City University of Hong Kong. His current interests include topics to do with popular literature, travel writing, and literary engagements with China. He is currently co-editing a special issue of Wasafiri: International Contemporary Writing, which focuses on Hong Kong writing twenty years after the handover. He is also the author of a forthcoming chapter on the Chinese novel in English for the Oxford History of the Novel in English. His recent publications have appeared in journals such as Neohelicon, Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies and ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature. [End Page 247]

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Additional Information

ISSN
2327-5898
Print ISSN
0007-8069
Pages
pp. 246-247
Launched on MUSE
2017-07-21
Open Access
No
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