Abstract

Raoul Peck's Academy Award-nominated documentary I Am Not Your Negro sheds light on what prompted him to abandon his earlier hope for racial harmony. We might also ask why this refusal so resonates today. I Am Not Your Negro and Get Out come five years after the death of Trayvon Martin and the subsequent acquittal of his killer, a period during which movements like Black Lives Matter have propelled racism to the forefront of American public discourse. It is against this backdrop that Baldwin has increasingly become the subject of renewed interest—and it is his later, more radical critiques of racism that offer the most insight into contemporary struggles.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1946-0910
Print ISSN
0012-3846
Pages
pp. 15-19
Launched on MUSE
2017-07-20
Open Access
No
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