Abstract

abstract:

This article examines the multiple "queer" identities readers encounter in Samuel Delany's "Aye, and Gomorrah" through an afrofuturist lens. In the short story, Delany presents contrasting depictions of sexuality and desire in queer spaces. This article argues that the short story positions queer utopia, sexuality, and desire within a sublimated discourse of race. The story's portrayal of social deviants such as gay voyeurs, fetishistic "frelks," and desexed "spacers" introduces contemporary readers to early developments in queer afrofuturism—especially its relationship to queer utopian community and posthuman desire.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2154-9648
Print ISSN
1045-991X
Pages
pp. 327-346
Launched on MUSE
2017-07-19
Open Access
No
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