Abstract

Less than thirty years ago, South Africa still had laws strictly prohibiting "interracial" intimacy. In this study, participants shared stories of living in Cape Town with a partner of a different "race" and invoked spatial metaphors, of boundaries and border crossing, describing their experiences in cartographical, "landscaped" language. This article reflects on how these metaphors relate to deeper social dynamics that shape the lives of those in "race"—trangressing relationships, and their own sense of agency in managing the correlative inner landscape. We suggest that these relationships are symbolic sites where society performs processes of ongoing racialization.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2165-8692
Print ISSN
2165-8684
Pages
pp. 267-295
Launched on MUSE
2017-07-17
Open Access
No
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