Abstract

Abstract:

Virginia Woolf's essay Three Guineas (1938) and her last novel Between the Acts (1941) refuse easy recuperation by progressive and activist politics. Emphasis on redemptive aspects of those texts elides the characteristic suspension and interruption of progress in Woolf's late works. The suspension is most strikingly evoked by Woolf's interruptive "dots." The dots intervene at pivotal moments in Three Guineas, halting the progress of the essay and suspending its readers between a desire for progressive action and a desire for withdrawal from action. Similarly disruptive of affirmative conclusions (and riddled with dots), Between the Acts dramatizes a yearning for stable collectivities that might exist outside of the apparently inevitable violence of war. But the novel suspends its own utopian project.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 18-34
Launched on MUSE
2017-07-13
Open Access
No
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