Abstract

In Britain’s colonial empire, managing agency capitalism linked businesses that had no presence in the colonial territories with suppliers of commodities produced there. Firms such as Harrisons and Crosfield, Ltd., one of the major agency houses in British Malaya, provided a crucial link between British capital and the Malayan rubber industry in the early twentieth century. Drawing on the archives of Harrisons and Crosfield, this article explains the mechanisms that allowed such firms to generate great profits based on the services they provided, and to control the management of plantations.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2180-4338
Print ISSN
0128-5483
Pages
pp. 73-100
Launched on MUSE
2017-06-29
Open Access
N

Copyright

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