Abstract

abstract:

Documents associated with the fall of James Hepburn, Earl of Both-well, in 1567 offer a rare insight into how texts were adapted for different purposes and readerships. Initially recorded in the manuscript "Register of the Acts of the Privy Council of Scotland," these texts subsequently appeared as printed broadsheets for public display in prominent places. They are the first Scottish documents of their kind known to have undergone this process of transition. As the texts passed from one medium to another, their form and punctuation were changed, mirroring their altered function. In this essay, Jeremy J. Smith shows that their differences in such formal features align quite precisely with the changing uses of literacy in early modern Scotland.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1544-399X
Print ISSN
0018-7895
Pages
pp. 223-238
Launched on MUSE
2017-06-20
Open Access
No
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