Abstract

Abstract:

Herodotus' Persian stories have a distinctive shape, well-rounded, often centring on the king and his court, with women prominent. This shaping has interpretative value, and so does the 'biographical' character of the Persian books: the stories are like that because the world is like that. Greek history is messier and less linear. How far does this explain Persian imperialism? Perhaps by explaining the difficulty of persuading the king to exercise restraint, given the problems of talking straight at court. Ultimately this may be more about power than about Persia, with the might of the Great King offering the clarity of extremes. The Athenian empire was now presenting an opposite extreme of democratic freedom, and the jury was out on how that would end.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2160-5157
Print ISSN
1040-3612
Pages
pp. 65-92
Launched on MUSE
2017-05-17
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2021
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.