Abstract

We examined the role of self-efficacy in preventing bystander inaction in dangerous alcohol situations. Participants (N = 504) completed an online survey that assessed whether they had previously witnessed or intervened in alcohol-related emergencies, their self-efficacy for intervening, and their likelihood of intervening in the future. Previously intervening was positively associated with self-efficacy and likelihood of intervening in the future. Furthermore, self-efficacy mediated the association between previously intervening and likelihood of intervening in the future. In conclusion, self-efficacy for intervening in social situations is associated with intervening in alcohol-related emergencies and is an important factor to consider when designing bystander interventions.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-3382
Print ISSN
0897-5264
Pages
pp. 451-456
Launched on MUSE
2017-05-04
Open Access
No
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