Abstract

Abstract:

Reflecting on her own healing from the trauma of losing her husband during the April 16, 2007, Virginia Tech massacre, the author explores how viewers can use television as an individualized tool for emotional strengthening. Television can give the freedom to explore post-traumatic feelings at one's own pace, assisting the ability to achieve control of emotions. In the essay, the author explores her repulsion toward fiction, caused by the need for moral witnessing, and how the HBO documentary fiction, Treme, challenged that response to trauma. The show entailed many features of moral witnessing, and its fictional components allowed viewers to access the inaccessible—the trauma caused by Hurricane Katrina—without risking exploitation of personal memories and intrusion of privacy. Ultimately, Treme paved the way for the author's return to fiction as a source of pleasure.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1085-7931
Print ISSN
0065-860X
Pages
pp. 41-73
Launched on MUSE
2017-04-24
Open Access
No
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