Abstract

In this article, the author explores the cosmopolitan elements that are intermingled with his apparently patriotic, even nationalistic, narratives. The author wants to argue that as Lao She's ultimate dream for the entire humanity, this cosmopolitan idealism, or the Great Unity of the world, comes from his own Manchu origin against the backdrop of the Han majority in China, his isolated personal experience as a young lecturer sojourning in London, the bitter experience of him and his family caused by the Western and Japanese invasions, his ambiguous religious beliefs, and his inheritance of the traditional Confucius culturing.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1528-4212
Print ISSN
0010-4132
Pages
pp. 125-140
Launched on MUSE
2017-04-03
Open Access
No
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