Abstract

The 2004 Canadian Assisted Human Reproduction Act bans commercial contract pregnancy and egg provision, but Canadians undertake cross-border reproductive travel to access these services. Feminist bioethicists have argued that the ethical justification for enforcing the ban domestically, namely exploitation, grounds its extraterritorial enforcement. I raise an additional problem when Global Southern or low-income countries are destinations for travel: neocolonialism. Further, I argue that a ban on commercialized reproduction is problematic. Although well-suited to address neocolonial forces of exploitation and commodification, a ban reinforces neocolonialism by paying insufficient attention to the agency of gestational laborers and egg providers.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1937-4577
Print ISSN
1937-4585
Pages
pp. 225-247
Launched on MUSE
2017-04-02
Open Access
No
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