Abstract

In this essay, I argue that pronatalism—a social bias in favor of gestational motherhood—and geneticism—a social bias in favor of genetic motherhood—are conceptually and operationally distinct social forces that influence some women’s reproductive decision making. Each of these social forces shapes the reproductive landscape, relates differently to women’s identities, and causes different social stigmatization and harm. Pronatalism and geneticism warrant feminist concern because they can compromise some women’s reproductive autonomy and well-being. I suggest that combating pronatalism and geneticism will require different sets of media, policy, education, and health care practice strategies.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1937-4577
Print ISSN
1937-4585
Pages
pp. 119-147
Launched on MUSE
2017-04-02
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.