Abstract

This article sheds light on John Rawls’s views on John Dewey’s philosophical temperament by investigating unpublished papers and lectures that Rawls wrote and delivered across the late 1940s, the 1950s, the 1960s, and the early 1970s. Moreover, the article shows that Rawls’s rejection of Kant’s dualisms predates by at least three decades the “Dewey Lectures” (1980) and that Dewey’s notion of deliberation as “dramatic rehearsal in imagination” might have had an impact on Rawls’s development of the notion of “reflective equilibrium” as a state of affairs that we strive to reach in ethical reflection.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3222
Print ISSN
0022-5037
Pages
pp. 287-298
Launched on MUSE
2017-03-31
Open Access
No
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