Abstract

Abstract:

When Aunt Judy’s Magazine first appealed to its child readers in 1868 to raise money for a cot at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children, it took advantage of the charitable impulses that had initially been developed by earlier missionary magazines. Yet it could not rely on the same organisational structures, such as Sunday schools and community involvement in the missionary society, to help promote child readers’ engagement with, and commitment to, the children’s hospital as a charitable cause. This article examines how the middle-class Aunt Judy’s Magazine used charitable content to attract and retain readers. It demonstrates how this content both contributed and responded to the philanthropic model of childhood depicted in the magazine as a whole.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1712-526X
Print ISSN
0709-4698
Pages
pp. 190-213
Launched on MUSE
2017-03-30
Open Access
No
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