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  • Contributors

MARY CHAPMAN is a professor of English at the University of British Columbia. She is the author of the award-winning Making Noise, Making News: Suffrage Print Culture and US Modernism (Oxford University Press, 2014) and the coeditor, with Angela Mills, of Treacherous Texts: US Suffrage Literature 1846–1946 (Rutgers University Press, 2011). Her Becoming Sui Sin Far: Early Fiction, Journalism, and Travel Writing by Edith Maude Eaton was just published by McGill-Queen’s University Press. She can be reached at mary.chapman@ubc.ca.

RYAN CORDELL is an assistant professor of English and a core founding faculty member in the NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks at Northeastern University. Cordell has published on antebellum newspapers and reprinting in Digital Humanities Quarterly and American Literary History. In 2013, he won the Best Article Award from ProQuest and the Research Society for American Periodicals for “‘Taken Possession of’: Hawthorne’s ‘Celestial Railroad’ in the Nineteenth-Century Evangelical Canon.” Cordell collaborates with colleagues in English, history, and computer science on the Viral Texts project (http://viraltexts.org), which is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Viral Texts uses robust data-mining tools to discover reprinted content across large-scale archives of nineteenth-century newspapers and magazines. He can be reached at r.cordell@neu.edu.

JACQUELINE EMERY is an assistant professor of English at SUNY College at Old Westbury, where she teaches courses in Native American and American women’s literature. She is currently completing an edited collection, Recovering Native American Writings in the Boarding School Press. She has published an article on Native American boarding school student writings in American Periodicals, and her essay “Writing to Belong: Alice Dunbar-Nelson’s Newspaper Columns in the African American Press” appeared in the Fall 2016 issue of Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers. She can be reached at emeryj@oldwestbury.edu.

LORI HARRISON-KAHAN is an associate professor of the practice of English at Boston College and author of The White Negress: Literature, Minstrelsy, and the Black-Jewish Imaginary (Rutgers University Press, 2011), which received an honorable mention for the Society for the Study of American Women Writers Book Award. She is currently editing a book titled The Superwoman and Other Writings: Fiction and Journalism by Miriam Michelson and serves as the book review editor of [End Page 120] Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States (MELUS). Her essay “Miriam Michelson’s Yellow Journalism and the Multi-Ethnic West,” which was coauthored by Karen E. H. Skinazi and appeared in the Summer 2015 issue of MELUS, won the Don D. Walker Prize from the Western Literature Association in 2016. Harrison and Skinazi also have a coauthored essay on Michelson, suffrage, and Progressive Era periodical culture, forthcoming in Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers. She can be reached at harrislo@bc.edu.

DESIRÉE HENDERSON is an associate professor of English at the University of Texas-Arlington. She is the author of Grief and Genre in American Literature, 1790-1870 (Ashgate, 2011). Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in a/b: Autobiography Studies, American Periodicals, Early American Literature, and Studies in American Fiction, among other journals. She can be reached at dhenderson@uta.edu.

LAE’L HUGHES-WATKINS is an assistant professor and the university archivist for the Department of Special Collections and Archives at Kent State University. Her research focuses on the development of outreach strategies used for acquisitions highlighting marginalized communities. She is particularly interested in examining the implementation of archival sources from historically underrepresented communities within a classroom framework and its impact on the learning environment. She can be reached at lhughesw@kent.edu.

BONNIE M. MILLER is an associate professor of American Studies at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. She is the author of From Liberation to Conquest: The Visual and Popular Cultures of the Spanish American War of 1898 (University of Massachusetts Press, 2011). Miller has also published journal articles in American Studies, Journal of American Studies, and the Bulletin of Hispanic Studies as well as multiple book chapters in anthologies covering topics in world’s fair studies, food studies, and the cultural history of American warfare. She can be reached at...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-4238
Print ISSN
1054-7479
Pages
pp. 120-123
Launched on MUSE
2017-03-27
Open Access
No
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