restricted access Biographies
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

Biographies

Kieran Aarons is the translator of François Zourabichvili’s Deleuze: A Philosophy of the Event and his Vocabulary of Deleuze (Edinburgh, 2012). He teaches philosophy at DePaul University in Chicago, where is completing a dissertation on the relationship between concepts of private property, emergency, and life in Western political thought. Kieran can be reached at kieranaarons@gmail.com

Elisabeth R. Anker is Associate Professor of American Studies and Political Science at George Washington University. She is the author of Orgies of Feeling: Melodrama and the Politics of Freedom (Duke, 2014) which was a finalist for the Romero Prize for the Best First Book in American Studies. Her next book project is titled Ugly Freedoms. Elisabeth’s email address is anker@gwu.edu

Charles Barbour is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Western Sydney University. Along with numerous articles and chapters, he is the author of The Marx-Machine (Lexington, 2012) and Derrida’s Secret (Edinburgh University Press, 2017). Charles’ email address is C.Barbour@westernsydney.edu.au

P.J. Brendese is Assistant Professor of Political Science and Co-Director of the Racism, Immigration and Citizenship Program at Johns Hopkins University. He works at the intersection of critical theory, racial politics, de-colonial theory, migration and comparative political thought. He is the author of The Politics of Memory in Democratic Politics (Rochester UP, 2014). Currently, he is completing a book manuscript entitled The Race of Segregated Time. P.J. can be reached at pbrende1@jhu.edu; his website is http://pjbrendese.com

Kevin Bruyneel is Professor of Politics at Babson College in Massachusetts He wrote The Third Space of Sovereignty: The Postcolonial Politics of US-Indigenous Relations, (University of Minnesota, Indigenous Americas Series, 2007) and writes on the relationship between race, colonialism and collective memory. He is working on a book manuscript on White Settler Memory in the United States. He has published articles in History & Memory, Settler Colonial Studies, The Canadian Journal of Political Science, and Native American and Indigenous Studies. He can be reached at kbruyneel@babson.edu, and his faculty website is here: http://www.babson.edu/Academics/faculty/profiles/Pages/Bruyneel-Kevin.aspx [End Page 286]

George Ciccariello-Maher is Associate Professor of Politics and Global Studies at Drexel University in Philadelphia and currently visiting researcher at the Institute for Social Research at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). He is co-editor, with Bruno Bosteels, of the Duke University Press book series Radical Américas, and author of We Created Chávez: A People’s History of the Venezuelan Revolution (Duke, 2013), Building the Commune: Radical Democracy in Venezuela (Jacobin-Verso, 2016), and Decolonizing Dialectics (Duke, 2017). George can be reached at gjc43@drexel.edu

Caitlyn Doyle is a doctoral candidate in the Comparative Literary Studies Program at Northwestern University, and the managing editor of Modernism/modernity. Her work explores the relation between aesthetics and politics, focusing particularly on 20th century French literature and theory, and on world cinema. Caitlyn’s current project explores the figure of the fugitive in the works of Marcel Proust, Samuel Beckett, and Chantal Akerman, drawing on the idea of ‘exhausting the possible,’ as it appears in the work of Gilles Deleuze. Caitlyn can be reached at caitlyn.p.doyle@gmail.com

Denise Ferreira da Silva is the Director of The Social Justice Institute (GRSJ) at the University of British Columbia, Visiting Professor of Law at Birkbeck University of London’s Law School (UK), and Adjunct Professor at Monash Architecture, Design, and Art, Monash University (Australia). She is co-editor of Race, Empire, and the Crisis of the Subprime (JHP 2013), author of Toward a Global Idea of Race (UMP, 2007) and several book chapters and articles, including “To be Announced” (Social Text, 2013) and “Toward a Black Feminist Poethics: The Quest(ion) of Blackness Towards the End of the World” (The Black Scholar, 2014). Denise may be contacted at dfsilva777@gmail.com

Andrew Dilts is Assistant Professor of political theory at Loyola Marymount University and a Member in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study (2016–2017). His work focuses on the relationships between race, sexuality, political membership, sovereignty, and punishment in the United...


pdf