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REVIEW OF HIGHER EDUCATION Volume 10 SUBJECT INDEX Number 1 Number 2 Number 3 Number 4 Academic freedom: litigation origins, 47-61 Academic senates, 373 Administration: academic organiza­ tion, 387; chairperson management strategy, 383; departmental deci­ sion making, 379; in loco parentis, 379; leadership and change, 383 Administrators: career patterns, 114, 115; department chairpersons, 111; gender differences, 112; labor mar­ ket, 115; mobility, 386; presidential selection, 319-332; salaries, 85-104 Admissions officers, 85-104 Aging and work effort, 111 Arizona State University: college major, 388 Arkansas: statewide reports, 109 Arthur D. Little Management Edu­ cation Institute, 107 Assessment: costs and benefits, 382 Athletes, 373 Autonomy: institutional, 388 Biology: specializations, 29-45 Black colleges: student persistence, 375; viability, 112 Cameron University, 375 Career choice, undergraduate expe­ rience, 374; women, 376 Case studies: change and leadership, 383; program review, 108; ungrad­ uated athletes, 373 Causal analysis: LISREL, 386 College choice, 111, 381 Colorado: statewide reports, 109 Competency examinations, 115 Cornell University: underprepared students, 108 Corporate education, 107 Corporate giving, 107 Pages 1-121 Pages 123-197 Pages 199-291 Pages 293-391 Costs: enrollment size effect, 1-28 Court litigation: academic freedom, 47-61; faculty managers, 112 Curriculum: general education, 379; remedial programs, 382; television instruction, 378 Decisionmaking, 114, 379 Department chairpersons, 111, 383 Doctoral degrees: Ph.D. vs. Ed.D., 281-286 Emporia State University: program review, 108 Enrollment: decline, 63-84, 113; effect on cost, 1-28; influences, 111; pri­ vate colleges, 379; projections, 333356 Evaluation: program, 106, 108 Exit examinations, 115 Faculty: aging and work effort, 111; appointment and termination, 199214 , 374; as managers, 112; behav­ ior, 116;academiccommon law, 295318 ; development, 115; future of professoriate, 109; participation in governance, 385; productivity, 110; reliance in litigation, 47-61; resources and rewards, 107; role in telecommunications, 375; special­ ization, 29-45; teacher/researcher ideal, 384 Financial aid: corporate, 107; educa­ tional outcomes, 388; payers and defaulters, 109; persistence factor, 384 Freshman experience, 106 Gender differences: characteristics, 112; salary, 85-104 General education, 115, 379 391 Governance: faculty/staff participa­ tion, 385 Graduation rates, 373 Graduate study: corporate, 107; doc­ toral student progress, 385; gradu­ ation rates, 369-372; student expec­ tations, 110 Higher education: fiction as study method, 387; field of study, 109, 110,369-372; historicalchanges, 110; Islamicroots, 386; pressures on, 159164 ; research on, 113,123-128,129134 ,135-142,143-150,151-158,165182 ; state planning, 377, state reg­ ulation, 109 Histories: medieval university, 386; of institutions, 357-368; of teacher/ researcher ideal, 384 In loco parentis, 379 Institutional advancement, 112 Institutional culture: enrollment pro­ jections, 333-356; official histories, 357-368; and performance, 381; presidential selection, 319-332, 380 Kansas: program review, 108 Kansas State University: program review, 108 Land grant universities: viability, 112 Leadership, 377, 383 Legal issues: academic common law, 295-318; commercial speech, 379; faculty managers, 112 Liberal arts: teaching conditions, 107 Maine: statewide reports, 109 Majors: math, 388; selection, 382 Marketing: graduate programs, 110, student college choice, 381 Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, 107 Michigan: statewide reports, 109 Minority groups: Chicano percep­ tions, 377; Mexican American per­ sistence, 106 Nebraska: statewide reports, 109 New York: statewide reports, 109; tuition assistance, 375 Oklahoma Talkback Television, 378 Organizational climate, 381, 383 Organizational theory: academic cul­ ture, 384; academic senates, 373; autonomy and litigation, 47-61; change and adaptation, 387; power of participants, 114; research uni­ versities, 106; response to enroll­ ment decline, 63-84; response to revenue decline, 215-234 Pennsylvania: strategic planning, 110 Persistence: institutional factors, 106; Mexican Americans, 106; student financial aid, 384 Political science: specializations, 2945 Presidents: biases and learning, 107; policy decisions, 377; role behavior, 376; selection, 295-332,380; spouses, 273-279 Private colleges: enrollment success, 379; faculty as managers, 112; pro­ gram review, 373; state policies, 389 Program discontinuance, 377 Program review: individualizing, 111; Kansas, 108; political factors, 111; private sector, 373; research prob­ lems, 108; standards, 378; use, 106 Reform reports, 114, 374 Remedial programs, 382 Research: agenda, 151-158; 165-182; community colleges, 183-192; crit­ icisms, 123-128; federal role, 380; flaws, 129-134; future of, 135-142; purposes, 113; research universi­ ties, 106; structure, 143-150 Residency requirements, 112 Resource allocation: budget...


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