Abstract

Byron lived through a period of transition in politics but also in attitudes to sexuality. This essay argues that Byron’s ambivalent attitudes towards same-sex love derived from conflicts between his education in the Greek and Roman classics and the spreading normative psychopathology of his age. It examines Byron’s self-fashioning within classical discourses of same-sex love, the role played by his Calvinist upbringing in inducing guilt and considers the extent to which he associated madness with offences against established sexual norms. It shows that Byron’s conflicting views were very much consistent with those of his time.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1757-0263
Print ISSN
0301-7257
Pages
pp. 139-149
Launched on MUSE
2016-12-22
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.