Abstract

This essay argues that Amiri Baraka is a crucial touchstone by which poets Fred Moten and Terrance Hayes convey their distinct aesthetic and sociopolitical commitments. Illuminating Moten’s and Hayes’s engagements with Baraka—particularly the inextricable relationship he maps between black music, poetry, and sociopolitical change—the essay complicates the literary genealogy recently advanced by Charles Rowell in Angles of Ascent: A Norton Anthology of Contemporary African American Poetry (2013), which elides Baraka’s influence. Instead, I emphasize Baraka’s lasting significance for Moten, Hayes, and by extension, a broad spectrum of twenty-first-century African American writers.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1945-6182
Print ISSN
1062-4783
Pages
pp. 329-342
Launched on MUSE
2016-12-19
Open Access
No
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