Abstract

Hamlet’s mention of his mother’s shoes in his opening soliloquy is part of a family of references in the play which direct attention to the stage--and specifically the dedicated stage of the London playhouses--as a stable medium for theatrical performance. In Hamlet, what had been considered the limitations of that stage are for the first time reconceived as assets: its flatness, its blank neutrality help shape Shakespeare’s conception of Denmark as a place of transition, of serial occupations and abandonments. The persistence of that stage in comparison to the mutability of all it contains marks a new development in Shakespeare’s understanding of the play as a metaphor for the evanescence of being.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 959-987
Launched on MUSE
2016-12-08
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.