Abstract

Melville’s depictions of non-Western tribes suggest his keen appreciation of spontaneous orders as described by Hayek, and his masterpiece Moby-Dick likewise exhibits a Hayekian esteem for the modern market order. Moreover, the Pequod’s transformation from an element in that order to an instrument of revenge suggests an allegory of America transformed, to use Oakeshott’s terms, from the nomocracy envisioned by founders like Madison into a teleocracy. Written at a time of mounting skepticism, Moby-Dick depicts the vulnerability of liberal institutions whose spirit may fail to align with the people’s hunger for a substantive, collective purpose.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2161-6302
Print ISSN
0038-1861
Pages
pp. 367-389
Launched on MUSE
2016-11-09
Open Access
No
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