Abstract

Data from the 2014 National Center on Deaf-Blindness Count show that fewer than 100 infants and toddlers are currently identified with deaf-blindness across the United States and that identification rates for this population vary greatly from state to state. The author presents a key rationale for timely and accurate identification of early-onset deafblindness and of the challenges involved in current early identification practices. Health and educational providers play a vital role in efforts to understand the impact of deafblindness on early development, high-risk conditions, and diagnoses associated with pediatric deafblindness, as well as the warning signs of early-onset hearing and vision loss. Subsequent to diagnosis, medical treatments may be available to restore or augment sensory functioning. Therefore, early detection and identification of deafblindness should serve as a catalyst for prompt referral to appropriate early intervention services for both child and family.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-0375
Print ISSN
0002-726X
Pages
pp. 412-423
Launched on MUSE
2016-11-05
Open Access
No
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