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  • The Contributors

Sarah E. Croco is an associate professor in the Department of Government and Politics and a faculty associate at the Center for International Development and Conflict Management at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her research interests include international conflict, the process by which citizens assign leaders responsibility for international wars, the value of policy consistency in elections, territorial disputes, and civilian targeting. Her book, Peace at What Price?, was published in 2015. She can be reached at scroco@umd.edu.

Jessica L. P. Weeks is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her research focuses on the domestic politics of foreign policy, the domestic and international politics of authoritarian regimes, and public opinion about foreign policy. Her book, Dictators at War and Peace, was published in 2014. She can be reached at jweeks@wisc.edu.

Richard F. Doner is a professor of political science at Emory University. His books include The Politics of Uneven Development: Thailand’s Economic Growth in Comparative Perspective (2009); From Silicon Valley to Singapore: Location and Competitive Advantage in the Hard Disk Drive Industry (2000) with David McKendrick and Stephan Haggard; and Driving a Bargain: Automobile Industrialization and Japanese Firms in Southeast Asia (1991). He has also written on topics such as the origins of institutional strength, the political economy of sector-specific growth in Southeast Asia, business associations, and education. He can be reached at rdoner@emory.edu.

Ben Ross Schneider is a professor of political science at mit and the director of the mit-Brazil program. His recent books include New Order and Progress: Development and Democracy in Brazil (2016), Designing Industrial Policy in Latin America: Business-Government Relations and the New Developmentalism (2015), and Hierarchical Capitalism in Latin America (2013). He has also written on topics such as economic reform, democratization, the developmental state, education, labor markets, and business groups. He can be reached at brs@mit.edu.

Christopher M. Sullivan is an assistant professor of political science at Louisiana State University. His research explores the microfoundations of political order in Guatemala, Northern Ireland, and the United States. He can be reached at csullvian@lsu.edu.

Emil Aslan Souleimanov is an associate professor of international area studies in the Institute of International Studies, Faculty of Sciences, at Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. His recent research focuses on the microdynamics and political ethnography of insurgency and counterinsurgency, with emphasis on Russia’s North Caucasus. His recent book is The Individual Disengagement of Avengers, Nationalists, and Jihadists: Why Ex-Militants Choose to Abandon Violence in the North Caucasus (2014), coauthored with Huseyn Aliyev. He can be reached at souleimanov@fsv.cuni.cz.

David S. Siroky is an associate professor of political science in the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University, where he is a core faculty member of the Center for Social Dynamics and Complexity and a faculty affiliate of the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, the Melikian Center for Russian, Eurasian, and East European Studies, and the Center on the Future of War. Siroky’s research focuses on the sources of nationalism, particularly its separatist strain, and on the causes and consequences of collective violence. He can be reached at david.siroky@asu.edu. [End Page ii]

Jeffrey Kucik is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the City College of New York. His work explores the formation, design, and distributional consequences of market institutions. He is also interested in the political economy of conflict. He can be reached at jkucik@ccny.cuny.edu.

Krzysztof J. Pelc is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at McGill University. His research examines questions in international political economy. His forthcoming book is Making and Bending International Rules: The Design of Exceptions and Escape Clauses in Trade Law. He can be reached at kj.pelc@mcgill.ca. [End Page iii]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3338
Print ISSN
0043-8871
Pages
pp. ii-iii
Launched on MUSE
2016-10-12
Open Access
No
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