Abstract

Abstract:

Through case studies of key texts across the history of queer inquiry, this article analyzes the temporality, affectivity, and politicization of the term queer in its academic usages. I argue that despite the frequency with which queer inquiry has described itself as uncommitted to its pasts and by definition attuned to questions of immediate political urgency, it remains affectively haunted by the historical and political moment of the U.S. 1990s in which it emerged. I close by offering “attachment genealogy” as a method of exposing, fragmenting, and reworking queer historical inheritances to enable queer to do different work in new contexts.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1934-1520
Print ISSN
0732-1562
Pages
pp. 173-189
Launched on MUSE
2016-10-07
Open Access
No
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