Abstract

I argue that Cormac McCarthy’s The Counselor, set amid the U.S.–Mexican drug wars, critiques late capitalism through self-reflexive genre filmmaking. Centered on the metaphor of trash, this essay connects the film’s low-art spectacle with the drug trade’s entrenchment in globalization and multinational capitalism. The Counselor, in effect, resists cinema’s central role in the culture industry by tying its “trashy” plot to the historically pressing narcotics crisis and the twenty-first century’s accumulating trash heaps.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2333-3065
Print ISSN
2333-3073
Pages
pp. 204-226
Launched on MUSE
2016-09-16
Open Access
No
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