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  • Contributing Authors

keisha n. blain is an assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Iowa. She is currently completing her first book, which examines how black nationalist women engaged in national and global politics from the early twentieth century to the 1950s. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of Social History; Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society; and Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International.

ashley farmer is an assistant professor of history and African American studies at Boston University. She is the author of several articles about African American women’s black power activism, black radicalism, and Pan-Africanism. Her first book, What You’ve Got Is a Revolution: Black Women’s Movements for Black Power (forthcoming), is a history of women’s intellectual production in the black power movement. She received her PhD in African American studies from Harvard University.

asia leeds is an assistant professor in the African Diaspora and the World Program at Spelman College. Born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland, Leeds is a graduate of the African Diaspora studies PhD program at UC Berkeley and held the Dean’s Social Science in Practice Postdoctoral Fellowship at UCLA. She is currently working on a book that investigates the shifting and contested meanings of race and citizenship in early- to mid-twentieth-century Costa Rica, using archival materials that include newspapers, petitions, and photographs.

minkah makalani is an associate professor in the Department of African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas, Austin. He works in the fields of intellectual history, black political thought, radicalism, race, and diaspora in the United States and Caribbean. He is the author of In the Cause of Freedom: Radical Black Internationalism from Harlem to London, 1917–1939 (2011). His work has appeared in Souls, Social Text, and The Journal of African American History, and the [End Page 296] collections White Out: The Continuing Significance of Racism (2003), Race Struggles (2009), Outside In: The Transnational Circuitry of U.S. History (forthcoming), and C. L. R. James’s forthcoming Beyond a Boundary: Fifty Years On. He is coeditor (with Davarian Baldwin) of Escape from New York: The New Negro Renaissance beyond Harlem (2013). Makalani is currently working on a history of C. L. R. James’s return to Trinidad from 1958–62, which explores James’s thinking about democracy, the arts, and Africa in conceptualizing a political future beyond available forms of governance inherited from the colonial state.

erik s. mcduffie is an associate professor of African American studies and history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include the history of the African Diaspora, black women, black radicalism, gender, sexualities, black radicalism, black masculinity, and the U.S. Midwest. His book Sojourning for Freedom: Black Women, American Communism, and the Making of Black Left Feminism (2011) received the 2012 Wesley-Logan Prize from the American Historical Association and the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, as well as the 2011 Letitia Woods Brown Award from the Association of Black Women Historians. He has published in several journals, including Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society; the Journal of African American History; Biography; African Identities; African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal; Radical History Review; American Communist History; and Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International. He is a member of the executive board of the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD).

courtney desiree morris is an assistant professor of African American and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at the Pennsylvania State University. Her work examines black women’s political activism and the geography of race on the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua. She received her PhD in anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her work has been published in American Anthropologist, make/shift: feminisms in motion, the Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology, and is forthcoming in the Bulletin of Latin American Research.

jeffrey w. parker earned his PhD in Latin American history at the University of Texas at Austin. His research focuses on the transnational history...

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Additional Information

ISSN
2326-0947
Print ISSN
2326-0939
Pages
pp. 296-298
Launched on MUSE
2016-09-14
Open Access
No
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