Abstract

Abstract:

The early modern Ryūkyūan play Timizi nu in (The Bond of Water in Hands) is commonly attributed to Heshikiya Chōbin (1700–1734), an aristocrat whose views on love and human nature clashed with the Ryūkyūan royal state’s Neo-Confucian orthodoxy. As a proto-Romantic outlier in the otherwise ideologically narrow early modern Ryūkyūan repertory, Timizi nu in helped shape the development of modern Okinawan theatre and remains quite popular today. This article connects Timizi nu in to its intellectual historical context and sheds light on its aesthetic characteristics, paying particular attention to its use of allusion to establish links with the Ryūkyūan and mainland Japanese literary traditions.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2109
Print ISSN
0742-5457
Pages
pp. 270-309
Launched on MUSE
2016-08-09
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.